There is nothing graphic in this article, but consider this a trigger warning.

citizen: "it's a bird! "
citizen: "it's a plane! "
superman: "it's a metaphor"
61,903 notes
taylorswifthecreator:

dreadfulseahag:

party-wok:

braiker:

Are you fucking kidding me? Did we all just wake up in 1938?

Jaw on the fucking floor.

nope nope nope nope nope nope nope nope nope

pro-putin folk are also antisemites u dont say
16,207 notes
humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?""Probably sitting at the kitchen table with my dad, an hour after my mother died, realizing we had to figure out what we were going to do for lunch."
34,368 notes
asianhistory:

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

Wonderful to get further sources. 

grrrl-anachronism:

Imagine if people dismissed other forms of communication the way they do the internet.

“Why are you being such an asshole to me?”

“OH MY GOD THIS IS THE TELEPHONE! Stop taking it so seriously!”

(via liamdryden)

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar,” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. “My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.”
It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions? How often had I sped past them as I learned of male achievement and men’s place in the history books? Then I read Rosalind Miles’s book “The Women’s History of the World” (recently republished as “Who Cooked the Last Supper?”) and I knew I needed to look again. History is full of fabulous females who have been systematically ignored, forgotten or simply written out of the records. They’re not all saints, they’re not all geniuses, but they do deserve remembering.
written by Sandi Toksvig, ‘Top 10 unsung heroines’ (via memereve)

(via nauticalwhispers)

307 notes

sirtarantino:

a guy walked into the board room and said

"hi sweetheart if you could fix me up a coffee real quick im meeting with the regional reports manager in like five minutes, thanks darling"

and i just stared at him and coldly said

"i am the regional reports manager"

we are now twenty minutes into this board meeting and i dont think i’ve ever seen a man look so embarrassed and afraid in my whole life

(Source: sofiajonze, via pooky-chan)

111,161 notes
phoenix5power:

This actually made me fucking cry.